Tuesday, August 22, 2006

When did it happen for you?

Quote from my six year old this morning:

"Mom, I don't want school to start because first grade is when things start to get really serious."

Now, myself--I didn't think first grade was nearly serious enough. Way too many mimeographed work sheets being colored and counting songs being sung when we could have been reading for real and doing experiments on bugs. To me things got serious in third grade with the arrival of long division and borrowing in subtraction: the first schoolwork related things I remember not "getting" on the first go.

When did it happen for you?

18 comments:

Linda (FM) said...

Second grade, when we started diagraming sentences.

Listing Straight said...

About the third grade, when I started hearing about the importance of getting into a good college in order to get a good (high paying) job.

Stacey said...

At the end of eighth grade, when I was hauled into the principal's office for a lengthy lecture about "working up to my potential," and then my parents told me that they couldn't pay for college, so my GPA would need to be my ticket to higher education.

zorra said...

Second grade, at the point at which I was introduced to multiplication and my lifelong math phobia began. The principal had one-on-one sessions with me in her inner office, using a little "times tables" wheel of some sort, and I finally got it. Had it not been for that dear lady, I doubt I would know my times tables today.

Quotidian Grace said...

Guess I'm a slow starter. High school! Because that is when grades counted for college admission. Up until then it was all fluff!

revabi said...

Not sure, but I think it started right off the bat in 1st grade. I had to stay in during p.e. to practice writing. And it just kept up from there. I was not good school material.

Kindergarten has more to it these days too.

ppb said...

um, college....
I was such a lazy kid.

Katherine said...

I hated school from the very first day of pre-school. I hated it so much in Kindergarten that I faked sick so much they took me to the doctor.

And yet somehow I managed to get a masters degree without even a year of respite. Last year was the first year I wasn't in school from the time I was four.

Teri said...

hmm, i actually think maybe it was seminary for me. Through all my school years and even in college, things worked for me and I rarely had to try. (sorry, not bragging, just saying what my mom always said--usually in relation to my inability to tutor classmates because "everything just comes so easily to you.") But in seminary, when grades mattered for my scholarship, when my vocation depended on the stuff, when it really mattered to my life--that's when it got serious. before that was easy A's. (excpet calculus, which is a whole story of its own.)

Princess of Everything (and then some) said...

eerrrmmmm.....they asked my mom to take me out of kindergarden. I was a drop out.

It did not get hard for me until my freshman year and that was only because we moved.

My son is doing things his freshman year that we never did in high school.

Diedre said...

In fifth grade they taught us the theory of evolution. What's a sunday school kid going to do on the test? This opened up my first theological discussion with my father (a wonderul man) and I've been going strong ever since. =)

SpookyRach said...

I never learned how to do percentages. Never.

Anonymous said...

Kindergarten is when I started to learn the hard lessons in life. Our "average" kindergarten class had the priviledge of going to listn to the "smart" kindergarten class read to us. I wanted to know why we couldn't be reading the same books.

Mrs. M said...

I was raised by perfectionists-- I think it was before kindergarten, when my father made sure I understood that the animal was a "horse," not a "horsie."

JWD said...

I think I gotta go with seventh grade. Our science teacher had dead things floating in jars of formaldehyde all around the room. "A Brain is a terrible thing to waste!" she would intone to us. And she could prove it. Because she had some brains in the jars, too. Creepy.

Conrad said...

Serious? Things got serious when I graduated from college and found that reality bites and idealism had to end. I'm a late-bloomer, eh?

hipastorzwife2B said...

When I got real homework.

The Thief said...

Seventh grade: when I found out that adults didn't like kids.

or

College: when I found out that studying was necessary in order to get those A's (which were so easy to obtain all through high school)